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Baltimore Divorce Lawyers Discuss Unexpected Risk Factors for Divorce

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Roughly 50% of marriages end in divorce. While most couples cite financial stress, infidelity and changing values as the major causes of their split, some recent studies have indicated several other surprising factors linked to higher divorce rates. Of course, the presence of one or more of these factors alone does not mean that a couple is doomed, but they may cause additional strain to a marriage that is already less than perfect.

  1. You have a long commute to work.

Long days and late nights at work can take their toll on a marriage. According to one Swedish study, adding a long commute to that can push many marriages to their breaking point. Researchers tracked millions of couples and found that those with work commutes longer than 45 minutes one way were more likely to divorce than those who worked closer to home.

  1. Your friends are getting divorced.

According to a study published in the social research journal Social Forces, couples with friends who divorced were 33% more likely to do the same. The odds were even higher (75%) if the divorcing couple was a close friend or family member.

  1. Your oldest child is a girl.

Couples with a firstborn daughter are more likely to divorce than those who have a firstborn son, according to 60 years of U.S. census data. Also, unmarried couples are 42% more likely to get married after having a son.

  1. The wife became seriously ill.

Studies suggest that women are better able to handle the strain of caring for a sick spouse than men are. One recent study found that marriages between couples over the age of 50 were six percent more likely to crumble following a wife’s stroke, or diagnosis of a serious illness such as cancer, lung or heart disease.

  1. The wife is a doctor.

The work demands of a physician can be a strain on a marriage, but surprisingly, the odds of it leading to divorce depend on which spouse holds the medical degree. Physician wives who work more than 40 hours per week have higher than average divorce rates. The opposite is true when the husband is working more than 40 hours as a doctor.

  1. You split the housework 50-50.

This statistic really seems counter-intuitive, but according to a Norwegian study, couples who share the housework equally have higher divorce rates. Researchers speculate that these couples may be treating each other more like business associates rather than intimate, loving partners.

  1. The wife drinks more than her husband.

Alcohol abuse and addiction lead to higher divorce rates across the board, no matter which spouse does the drinking. However, one study found that when women drink excessively more than their husbands, the divorce rates actually triple.

  1. You both are physically fit.

While maintaining a healthy weight can be the key to life longevity, it can also increase the odds of getting a divorce. Researchers analyzed more than 2,700 divorce filings and found that 76% of them occurred between spouses who each weighed less than 200 pounds. Couples who weighed in at over 250 pounds had the lowest divorce rates.

  1. Lack of connection.

A 2013 study published in Biological Psychology focused on women’s ability to process oxytocin, the so-called love hormone linked to happiness and intimate connection. They found that some women possess a gene variant that prevents them from processing oxytocin properly, making them 50% more likely to have a troubled marriage.

Baltimore Divorce Lawyers at the Law Offices of Allyson B. Goldscher, LLC Assist Families Transitioning Through Divorce or Separation

Baltimore divorce lawyers at the Law Offices of Allyson B. Goldscher, LLC are dedicated to helping individuals find peaceful and effective resolutions to issues related to divorce, separation, child custody, child support and spousal support. We understand that every family has unique needs and challenges and we work hard to help them through this difficult time with minimal stress. To schedule an appointment, call 410-602-9522 today or submit an online contact form.